Index of Race & Opportunity

Nebraska was founded under values of opportunity and equality for all, but when looking at the data and research on Nebraska’s children and families, a harsher reality is uncovered– one of disparity and lack of equitable chance of future success and opportunity for children of color. In response to this, the Index of Race & Opportunity for Nebraska Children was created. A composite score of 13 indicators of child well-being was calculated to highlight disparities in opportunity and measure progress toward race equity and inclusion.

7 key steps

Used to help advance and embed race equity and inclusion at all levels of policy creation

Step 1

Establish an understanding of race equity and inclusion principles.

Step 2

Engage affected populations and stakeholders.

Step 3

Gather and analyze disaggregated data.

Step 4

Conduct systems analysis of root causes of inequities.

Step 5

Identify strategies and target resources to address root causes of inequities.

Step 6

Conduct race equity impact assessment for all policies and decision-making.

Step 7

Continuously evaluate effectiveness and adapt strategies.

Indicators used include:

Health

  • Children with health insurance coverage
  • Infants receiving adequate prenatal care

Education

  • 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school
  • Reading proficiently at 3rd grade
  • 16-24-year-olds employed or attending school

Economic Stability

  • Children living above the Federal Poverty Level
  • Median family income
  • Children living in a low-poverty areas

Juvenile Justice

  • Youth who have completed a diversion program successfully
  • Youth who have completed probation successfully

Child Welfare

  • Children not involved in the child welfare system
  • Children who are wards of the state, but are living at home
  • Children who are living in out-of-home care, but have done so in 3 or fewer placements

Children with health insurance coverage (2014)1

Infants receiving adequate prenatal care (2015)2

3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school (2014)3

3rd graders reading proficiently (2015)4

16-24-year-olds in school or
employed (2014)5

Sources:
1. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Tables C27001B-I.2. Vital Statistics, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).
3. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Public Use Microdata Samples.
4. Nebraska Department of Education.
5. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Public Use Microdata Samples.

Children living above the federal poverty
line (2014)1

Median family income (2015)2

Children living in areas that are low
poverty (2014)3

Sources:
1. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Tables B17001B-I.
2. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Tables B19113B-I.
3. U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, Tables B17001B-I.

Youth successfully completing diversion (2015)1

Youth successfully completing probation (2015)2

Children not involved in the child welfare system [Rate/1,000] (2015)3

State Wards receiving in-home
services (2015)3

Children with three or fewer out-of-home placements (2015)3

1. Crime Commission.
2. Office of Probation Administration.
3. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)